Take Action!

Fresh Approach Hawaii is active at the Hawaii State Legislature on issues related to marijuana law reform. This page will help keep you informed about upcoming bills, opportunities to testify, and sample testimony.

CURRENT ACTION ALERTS:

See the “Track Bills” section for the latest status, no action alerts at this time. Mahalo, and please check back, or join us on social media!

__________________________________________________________________________________________

PAST ACTION ALERTS:

4/2/13: TAKE ACTION: Encourage your legislators to vote YES on SB 472!

SB 472 is up for a floor vote in the House of Representatives VERY soon and we need EVERYONE to call or email their elected official in the House of Representatives TODAY and tell them to vote YES on SB 472.

This is the moment to show our Representatives that this bill has the support from the Hawai‘i community by telling them to VOTE YES on SB 472. Please pass this on to your friends, family members, and colleagues and get them to support SB 472 as well.  Every call/email helps move this bill forward so the discussion can continue.

SB 472 (known officially as SB 472, HD 1) has gone through many changes as it has worked its way down the legislative pipes.  As it is written right now (view the bill here: http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/session2013/Bills/SB472_HD1_.HTM), SB 472 would decriminalize marijuana in Hawai‘i by removing criminal penalties for possession of marijuana of 20 grams or less for adults 18 and over, and instead treat the matter with a fine of $100, like a parking ticket.

This updated proposal fixes the problems of the Senate version by reducing the fine back to $100 (instead of $1000), including ages 18 and up (instead of 21 and over), but it reduces the possession from one ounce (28 grams) to 20 grams.

Those under the age of 18, if caught possessing 20 grams or less of marijuana, would still be charged with a petty misdemeanor and could lose their driver’s license for up to one year. While this updated language around minors’ possession is not what we advocated for, SB 472 is a step in the right direction for marijuana policy reform in Hawai‘i for adults 18 and over.

We plan to use the next year to have more conversations with community members and elected officials to answer questions they have on minors’ use of marijuana and how this penalty is affecting it.

But to get to that conversation with elected officials and community members, we need to pass SB 472 through the Hawai‘i House of Representatives.  

If you do not know who your Representative is, the Hawai‘i State Legislature website has an easy way for you to find out.

  1. Go to www.capitol.hawaii.gov
  2. On the top right hand corner is a box that says “Find Your Legislator”.  Enter in your physical street name only (For instance, if you live on 123 Jones Street, Just enter in “Jones”).
  3. Click “Go”.
  4. Scroll down to find your Representative that corresponds with your street name and address number.
  5. Click on the elected officials’ names to find the information for your legislator (office number or email address).

If you know who your elected official is, you can easily email them by entering in “Rep” and then their last name, followed by @capitol.hawaii.gov. So if Mickey Mouse was your Representative, then it would Repmouse@capitol.hawaii.gov.

This is one of the final hurdles for SB 472 and Hawaii’s marijuana policy change for 2013. I know it has been a long couple of months with a lot of debate not only at the Legislature, but also around Hawai‘i, in the newspapers, on TV, and around the kitchen tables.

3/21/13: TAKE ACTION: Encourage your legislators to vote YES on SB 472!

Contact your legislators http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/findleg.aspx?street=Enter%20Street%20Name, or write to all representatives: reps@hawaii.gov.

SB 472 – Relating to Marijuana:

Link to Bill: http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/session2013/Bills/SB472_HD1_PROPOSED_.htm

What this bill does: Decriminalizes possession of 20 grams of marijuana or less by removing all criminal penalties for possession by an adult (ages 18 and over) and instead treats it as a civil matter with a fine of $100, like a parking ticket.

Why Hawaii needs it: Punishing marijuana possession with a fine will save the state government money while eliminating arrest disaprities and allowing police to focus on serious crime.

Decriminalization allows police to spend money on serious and violent crimes:

  • Decriminalizing possession of marijuana could save state and county governments in Hawai‘i an estimated $9 million annually.(1)
  • Nationally, approximately $8 billion is spent every year arresting and prosecuting individuals for marijuana violations.(2) Almost 90% of these arrests are for marijuana possession only. (3)

Arrests for possession have increased over the last nine years in Hawaii.

  • Since 2004, possession arrests in Hawai‘i have increased almost 50% and distribution arrests almost doubled.(1)
  • There were 1,632 arrests for marijuana possession in 2010 (last data available.)
  • Compared to possession of marijuana – ice and violent crimes are much bigger problems. Our police should spend more time and resources going after violent crime or hard drugs.

In Hawai‘i marijuana laws do not impact all people equally:

  • Juveniles are 70% more likely to be arrested than adults.(1)
  • Native Hawaiians are 70% more likely to be arrested than non-native Hawaiians.(1)


Far more harm results from the criminalization of marijuana than from marijuana use itself:

  • Convicted marijuana offenders:
    • Are denied federal student aid;
    • Lose their professional licenses;
    • Encounter barriers to employment, housing, and adoption.
  • These penalties disproportionately affect young, low income, and minority individuals.(2)


Decriminalization does not increase marijuana use:

  • There is no evidence to support claims that criminalization reduces use or decriminalization increases use.(4)
  • Studies find that decriminalizing marijuana has had no effect on marijuana use among young people.(5)
  • Harsh marijuana laws do not deter use.(6)
  • Decriminalization does not allow anyone to sell marijuana, nor does it allow anyone to purchase or possess marijuana.
  • Marijuana is not a “gateway drug”.  The National Academy of Sciences found, “There is no conclusive evidence that the drug effects of marijuana are causally linked to the subsequent abuse of other illicit drugs.”(8)


Hawai‘i supports decriminalization:

  • 58% of Hawai‘i voters believe that marijuana possession for personal use should carry a fine instead of jail time.(7)
  • 75% of the registered voters in Hawai‘i said if their state legislator voted to decriminalize marijuana it would either have no impact on their vote or it would actually make them more likely to vote for that legislator.(7)


Hawai‘i should join the other states in the United States in decriminalizing marijuana:

  • 14 states have already decriminalized marijuana: Alaska, California, Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Mississippi, Nebraska, Nevada, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, and Rhode Island, plus in cities and counties in nine other states.  Cultivation and distribution remain criminal offenses.
  • In these states, the average possession for treating possession as a civil matter with a fine is 1.46 ounces. One ounce or less is the most common amount. Only Connecticut and North Carolina have decriminalized marijuana for less than an ounce (both are at ½ ounce or less).
  • In November 2012, Colorado and Washington went a step further and passed voter initiatives to tax and regulate marijuana for recreational use.


Federal laws do not stand in the way:

  • Nothing in the Constitution or in federal law prohibits states from having penalties that differ from federal law.


Studies cited:

1.     Nixon, David.  Update to: Budgetary Implications of Marijuana Decriminalization in Hawai’i. Public Policy Center: University of Hawai’i, Dec 2012. <www.dpfhi.org>
2.     Duncan, Cynthia.  “The Need for Change: An Economic Analysis of Marijuana Policy.” Connecticut Law Review 14 (July 2009)
3.     United States. Federal Bureau of Investigation’s combined Uniform Reports.  Crime in the United States: Table: Arrest for Drug Abuse Violations.  U.S. Department of Justice: Washington, DC. 2010.
4.     Reinarman, Cohen, and Kaal. “The Limited Relevance of Drug Policy: Cannabis in Amsterdam and San Francisco.” American Journal of Public Health 94.5  (May 2004)
5.     Williams, Jenny. “The Effects of Price and Policy on Marijuana Use: What Can Be
Learned from the Australian Experience?” Health Economics 13 (2004): 123-137.
6.     Connecticut.  Connecticut Law Review Commission.  Drug Policy in Connecticut and Strategy Options: Report to the Judiciary Committee of the Connecticut Assembly.  State Capitol: Hartford, 1997.
7.     QMark Research & Polling.  November 19 –December 4, 2012.  Survey of 603 adults statewide, MOE +/-4%
8.     National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Medicine.  “Marijuana and Medicine: Assessing the Science Base”.  National Academy Press: Washington, DC, 5, 6. 1999.

——————————————————————–

3/4/13:

Three bills are up for a final vote before they would cross over to the other Chamber.  We need everyone to call or email their elected officials and tell them to vote “Yes” in support of the following bills.

First, in the House, both HB 667 (a bill that would make some much needed improvements to Hawaii’s Medical Cannabis program) and HB 668 (a bill that would transfer the Medical Cannabis program to the Department of Health) are up for a full floor vote.  We need everyone to email/call their elected officials and tell them to vote “Yes” on HB 667 and HB 668.

You can read HB 667 here: http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/measure_indiv.aspx?billtype=HB&billnumber=667

You can read HB 668 here: http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/measure_indiv.aspx?billtype=HB&billnumber=668

The Senate unanimously passed SB 472, a bill that would replace the current criminal penalties for possession of an ounce or less of marijuana with a civil violation and a fine of up to $1000. We will be working with members in the House to not only reduce the fine, but as well as add in some much needed provisions.

You can read SB 472 here: http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/measure_indiv.aspx?billtype=SB&billnumber=472

The House Judiciary Committee will be hearing HB 667, HD 1, this Thursday, February 28, at 2 pm. This measure that would make some much needed improvements to Hawaii’s medical cannabis program.

As this is the final Committee in the House, we need to get as much testimony as we can to ensure that this bill passed through the House and gets to the Senate.  All testimony must be in by 5:00 pm on Wednesday, February 27, 2013. Late testimony may also be accepted, may not be reflected int he record, and is given to the committee .

The hearing is taking place on Thursday, February 28, at 2 pm in room 325.  It is the first bill on the agenda.

HB 667, HD 1 – Relating to Medical Marijuana

Bill Summary: Improves aspects of the Medical Use of Marijuana program (see below for summary of improvements).

Link to Bill: http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/measure_indiv.aspx?billtype=HB&billnumber=667&year=2013

Link to Hearing Notice: http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/session2013/hearingnotices/HEARING_JUD_02-28-13_.HTM

Two ways to submit testimony:

1) By Email: E-mail if less than 5 pages in length, to the Committee at JUDtestimony@capitol.hawaii.gov. Please indicate the measure, date and time of the hearing. Email sent to individual offices or any other office will not be accepted.

2) By Web: Online if less than 4MB in size, at http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/emailtestimony

USE THE FOLLOWING HEADER:

To: Representative Karl Rhoads, Chair

Representative Sharon Har, Vice-Chair

From: (Your Name)

RE: HB 667, HD 1 – Relating to Medical Marijuana

Hearing: Thursday, February 28, 2013, 2 pm, Room 325

Position: Strong Support

What this bill proposes:

  • Allows registered patients or caregivers to provide usable marijuana or any part of the marijuana plant to any other qualifying patient or caregiver as long as no money is exchanged and that the total amount of marijuana possessed by the recipient does not exceed the “adequate supply” permitted by law.
  • Caregivers will be allowed to care for up to 3 qualifying patients (raised from the current 1:1).
  • Qualifying patients shall be immune from searches, seizures, and prosecution for marijuana-related offenses while transporting it.
  • Out of state qualifying patients who are from states/jurisdictions that allow the medical use of marijuana are authorized to use marijuana while in Hawai‘i as long as they have a valid registry ID card from their home state/jurisdiction (“reciprocity.”).
  • Increases the amount that qualifying patients and caregivers are allowed to 5 ounces of usable marijuana (up from 3) and removes the “immature” and “mature” definitions from the law so patients/caregivers are allowed 7 plants, regardless of state of growth.
  • Allows reimbursement to caregivers for costs associated with assisting qualifying patients as long as the reimbursement does not include the sale of marijuana.
  • Removes identifying information, such as the location of where the marijuana is grown, from registry cards issued to patients and caregivers.
  • Physicians do not have to disclose the specific medical condition of their qualifying patients to the controlling state Department but just that the patient qualifies for use of medical marijuana,
  • Increases the amount of time for qualifying patients to report any changes of information from 5 days to 10 days.

Talking Points:

Write your own reasons for wanting to improve the medical cannabis program. It is always a good idea to use your personal experiences and stories.  You may also use two or three of the talking points I’ve provided below. Try to address the details in the bill you are testifying on since there may be some parts you like more than others.

The program was put in place 13 years ago to provide compassionate care to Hawaii’s sick and debilitated, not to cause them more grief and stress.

  • The law has been in place for 13 years without any improvements even though other states and medical advancements have shown how Hawaii’s program can be improved upon.
  • Patients are law-abiding citizens who are seriously ill, or who have chronic conditions and who want to comply with the law but find it difficult with the current system.
  • This measure is needed immediately because although a legal dispensary is being considered by the legislature, it may be some time before they are in operation. In the meantime, patients need improvements in the program.
  • This measure allows patients and caregivers to help other patients by allowing them to give some of their medicine to qualifying caregivers and patients. This is especially helpful to patients who cannot wait to grow their own, who have had a crop failure, or need seeds or clones to start off with.  Also, many patients, such as those undergoing chemotherapy, have debilitating pain, or suffer from immediate symptoms, need medicine immediately, and this bill corrects that portion of the current law.
  • Patients who choose not to smoke their medicine say that the current limit on how much cannabis they can possess is not sufficient for their needs. Patients require more cannabis when using vaporizers, edibles or tinctures. If they cannot possess sufficient supply, then they are forced to smoke their medicine rather than use their preferred, less harmful method.

Hawai‘i should do a better job of protect patients’ privacy.

  • This measure protects patient privacy by removing the address where the marijuana is grown from the registry card. Then, if a wallet is stolen or lost, for instance, the location of the medical cannabis is not revealed.
  • Under this proposal the “qualifying condition” of the patient will not be disclosed to the Department running the program.

Hawai‘i needs to encourage caregivers to help care for the sick who use medical cannabis, not discourage them. 

  • Caregivers are difficult to find and allowing them to care for additional patients improves patient access to needed medicine.
  • Many patients need caregivers because they are:
    • Too sick to grow their own plants.
    • Live in a location where it is illegal/forbidden (such as in federal housing or in apartment complexes in urban areas).
    • Live in a location where it is dangerous to grow their medicine.
    • Do not have the knowledge, time or space to grow their own medicine.
  • This bill allows caregivers to be reimbursed for the costs they incur (e.g., grow lights, soil, water and electricity costs, time spent growing, travel costs, etc.).
  • This provides incentives for caregivers to give good care to their patients and protects them from prosecution by law enforcement officials for “selling drugs”.

Hawai‘i should permit medical cannabis patients from other medical cannabis jurisdictions to be afforded the same rights as state residents while they are visiting.

  • In a state with a large tourist industry visitors should be allowed temporary protections from state and county laws.
  • Visiting patients who cannot carry their medicine with them should not have to do without it when they are in Hawai‘i on business or on vacation.
  • A small fee could be assessed for this privilege and access granted to dispensaries if/when they are in place. This would be another source of revenue for the state.

————————————–

2/22/13: TAKE ACTION: Submit Testimony for SB 472 to the Senate Judiciary and Labor Committee, Hearing on Tuesday, February 26, 2013, at 10 am.

SB 472 – Relating to Marijuana:

Link to Bill: http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/session2013/Bills/SB472_HD1_PROPOSED_.htm

Link to Hearing Notification: http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/session2013/hearingnotices/HEARING_JUD_03-14-13_.HTM

What this bill does: Decriminalizes possession of 20 grams of marijuana or less by removing all criminal penalties for possession by an adult (ages 18 and over) and instead treats it as a civil matter with a fine of $100, like a parking ticket.

Two ways to submit testimony:

1) By Email: E-mail if less than 5 pages in length, to the Committee at JUDtestimony@capitol.hawaii.gov. Please indicate the measure, date and time of the hearing. Email sent to individual offices or any other office will not be accepted.

2) By Web: Online if less than 4MB in size, at http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/emailtestimony

USE THE FOLLOWING HEADER:
To: Representative Karl Rhoads, Chair
Representative Sharon Har, Vice Chair
From: (Your Name)
RE: SB 472, HD 1 – Relating to Marijuana
Hearing: Thursday, March 14, 2013, 2:00 pm, Room 325
Position: Strong Support

Write your own reasons for your support of decriminalizing marijuana in Hawai‘i. A main theme could be that punishing marijuana possession with a fine will save the state government money while eliminating arrest disaprities and allowing police to focus on serious crime.

It is always a good idea to use your personal experiences and stories. You may also use two or three of the talking points I’ve provided below. Try to address the details in the bill you are testifying on since bills differ and there may be some parts you like more than others.

Decriminalization allows police to spend money on serious and violent crimes:

  • Decriminalizing possession of marijuana could save state and county governments in Hawai‘i an estimated $9 million annually.(1)
  • Nationally, approximately $8 billion is spent every year arresting and prosecuting individuals for marijuana violations.(2) Almost 90% of these arrests are for marijuana possession only. (3)


Arrests for possession have increased over the last nine years in Hawaii.

  • Since 2004, possession arrests in Hawai‘i have increased almost 50% and distribution arrests almost doubled.(1)
  • There were 1,632 arrests for marijuana possession in 2010 (last data available.)
  • Compared to possession of marijuana – ice and violent crimes are much bigger problems. Our police should spend more time and resources going after violent crime or hard drugs.


In Hawai‘i marijuana laws do not impact all of our population the same way:

  • Juveniles are 70% more likely to be arrested than adults.(1)
  • Native Hawaiians are 70% more likely to be arrested than non-native Hawaiians.(1)


Far more harm results from the criminalization of marijuana than from marijuana use itself:

  • Convicted marijuana offenders:
    • Are denied federal student aid;
    • Lose their professional licenses;
    • Encounter barriers to employment, housing, and adoption.
  • These penalties disproportionately affect young, low income, and minority individuals.(2)


Decriminalization does not increase marijuana use:

  • There is no evidence to support claims that criminalization reduces use or decriminalization increases use.(4)
  • Studies find that decriminalizing marijuana has had no effect on marijuana use among young people.(5)
  • Harsh marijuana laws do not deter use.(6)
  • Decriminalization does not allow anyone to sell marijuana, nor does it allow anyone to purchase or possess marijuana.
  • Marijuana is not a “gateway drug”.  The National Academy of Sciences found, “There is no conclusive evidence that the drug effects of marijuana are causally linked to the subsequent abuse of other illicit drugs.”(8)


Hawai‘i supports decriminalization:

  • 58% of Hawai‘i voters believe that marijuana possession for personal use should carry a fine instead of jail time.(7)
  • 75% of the registered voters in Hawai‘i said if their state legislator voted to decriminalize marijuana it would either have no impact on their vote or it would actually make them more likely to vote for that legislator.(7)


Hawai‘i should join the other states in the United States in decriminalizing marijuana:

  • 14 states have already decriminalized marijuana: Alaska, California, Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Mississippi, Nebraska, Nevada, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, and Rhode Island, plus in cities and counties in nine other states.  Cultivation and distribution remain criminal offenses.
  • In these states, the average possession for treating possession as a civil matter with a fine is 1.46 ounces. One ounce or less is the most common amount. Only Connecticut and North Carolina have decriminalized marijuana for less than an ounce (both are at ½ ounce or less).
  • In November 2012, Colorado and Washington went a step further and passed voter initiatives to tax and regulate marijuana for recreational use.


Federal laws do not stand in the way:

  • Nothing in the Constitution or in federal law prohibits states from having penalties that differ from federal law.


Studies cited:

1.     Nixon, David.  Update to: Budgetary Implications of Marijuana Decriminalization in Hawai’i. Public Policy Center: University of Hawai’i, Dec 2012. <www.dpfhi.org>
2.     Duncan, Cynthia.  “The Need for Change: An Economic Analysis of Marijuana Policy.” Connecticut Law Review 14 (July 2009)
3.     United States. Federal Bureau of Investigation’s combined Uniform Reports.  Crime in the United States: Table: Arrest for Drug Abuse Violations.  U.S. Department of Justice: Washington, DC. 2010.
4.     Reinarman, Cohen, and Kaal. “The Limited Relevance of Drug Policy: Cannabis in Amsterdam and San Francisco.” American Journal of Public Health 94.5  (May 2004)
5.     Williams, Jenny. “The Effects of Price and Policy on Marijuana Use: What Can Be
Learned from the Australian Experience?” Health Economics 13 (2004): 123-137.
6.     Connecticut.  Connecticut Law Review Commission.  Drug Policy in Connecticut and Strategy Options: Report to the Judiciary Committee of the Connecticut Assembly.  State Capitol: Hartford, 1997.
7.     QMark Research & Polling.  November 19 –December 4, 2012.  Survey of 603 adults statewide, MOE +/-4%
8.     National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Medicine.  “Marijuana and Medicine: Assessing the Science Base”.  National Academy Press: Washington, DC, 5, 6. 1999.

**********************************************************************************************************************

2/20/13: NORML action alert on SB 472 – removes criminal penalties from low-level marijuana offenses. Like a parking ticket…it’s not legalization, but it’s a good first step! Let’s make sure this bill gets heard! Ask the Senate Committee of Judiciary and labor to HEAR  SB 472!
http://capwiz.com/norml2/issues/alert/?alertid=62406956

1/29/13: TAKE ACTION: Submit Testimony for HB 699 to the House Judiciary Committee, Hearing on Friday, February 1, 2013 at 2 pm.

Talking Points on HB 699:

Please note that this bill addresses the taxation and regulation of marijuana but does not affect Hawaii’s medical marijuana law (limits, age, qualifying patients, caregivers, etc).

 What this bill does: Authorizes adults 21 years and older to possess or consume 1 ounce or less of marijuana for personal use.  Also provides for the licensing of marijuana cultivation and stores that are taxed and regulated.

Two ways to submit testimony:

1) By Email: E-mail if less than 5 pages in length, to the House Judiciary Committee at JUDTestimony@capitol.hawaii.gov. Please indicate the measure, date and time of the hearing (see below). Email sent to individual offices or any other office will not be accepted.

2) By Web: Online if less than 4MB in size, at http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/emailtestimony

USE THE FOLLOWING HEADER:

To: Rep. Karl Rhoads, Chair

Rep. Sharon Har, Vice Chair

From: (Your Name)

RE: Relating to Marijuana – HB 699

Hearing: Friday, February 1, 2013, Room 325

Position: Strong Support

Write your own reasons for your support of taxation and regulation of marijuana in Hawaii. It is always a good idea to use your personal experiences and stories. You may also use two or three of the talking points provided below. Try to address the details in the bill you are testifying on since there may be some parts you like more than others.

Talking Points:

Taxing and regulating makes economic sense for Hawai‘i1:

  • It would save $12 million a year in marijuana law enforcement costs.
  • It would bring in at least  $11.3 million a year in tax revenue.
  • Legalizing marijuana for adults will undercut dangerous drug cartels which sell millions of dollars in marijuana on the black market.

Prohibition has failed:

  • Marijuana use is mainstream and widespread. More than 106 million Americans have tried it and every year more than 80% of high school students say it’s easy to obtain (per Monitoring the Future survey.)

Prohibition makes control impossible:

  • Producers and sellers of marijuana are completely unregulated unlike sellers of tobacco and alcohol.
  • There are no quality controls for purity or potency.

Taxing and regulating marijuana allows police to spend money on serious and violent crimes1:

  • In Hawai‘i, marijuana arrests for possession have increased 50% since 2004.
  • Arrests for distribution have almost doubled since 2004.
  • Costs and law enforcement time spent on these could be used for more serious drug offenses like Hawaii’s methamphetamine problem or in addressing violent crimes.

 Hawaii’s marijuana laws are enforced unevenly1:

  • There is no evidence that any specific gender or ethnic group uses marijuana more than another group, but arrest data in Hawai‘i show a different story:
    • Males are 50% more likely to be arrested than females
    • Juveniles are 70% more likely to be arrested.
    • Native Hawaiians are 70% more likely to be arrested than non-native Hawaiians.
    • Filipinos are 30% more likely to be arrested than non-Filipinos.
    • Non-Oahu residents are 40-140% more likely to be arrested for possession than Oahu residents.
    • Convicted marijuana offenders:
      • Are denied federal student aid.
      • Lose their professional licenses.
      • Encounter barriers to employment, housing, and adoption.
      • These penalties disproportionally affect young, low income, and minority individuals.
      • While people who are convicted of marijuana related offenses are denied federal student aid, people convicted of violent crimes remain eligible.
      • Arrests for marijuana possession are one of the most common ways that people get caught up in the criminal justice system.
      • Marijuana users who are not convicted have gone on to be President or a Supreme Court justice.

Legalizing, taxing, and regulating marijuana for personal use will not increase youth consumption:

  • Selling to minors (under 21) will remain illegal.
  • Young people now have easy access to marijuana since drug dealers don’t check IDs.
  • Placing marijuana under strict regulatory control may actually decrease youth access here in Hawai‘i since regulated businesses could lose their license if they sell to minors while illegal dealers have no incentive not to sell to kids.

Hawai‘i residents support the taxation and regulation of marijuana2:

  • In a December 2012 poll, 57% of registered voters in Hawai‘i support legalizing, taxing, and regulating marijuana for personal use.
  • 76% believe police should focus their time on violent crimes and fighting the ice/methamphetamine problem in Hawai‘i.

Laws against driving while intoxicated and other anti-social behaviors will remain in place.

  • The current bill keeps penalties in place for those driving under the influence of marijuana.
  • The current bill does not allow for marijuana consumption in public places.
  • All forms of advertising will be prohibited.

References:

1 – Nixon, David.  Update to: Budgetary Implications of Marijuana Decriminalization and Legalization For Hawai‘i. University of Hawai‘i, Jan 2013. http://acluhawaii.files.wordpress.com/2013/01/econreptmarijuana1_2013.pdf

2 – QMark Research & Polling.  November 19 –December 4, 2012.  Survey of 603 adults statewide, MOE +/-4% http://acluhawaii.files.wordpress.com/2013/01/dpagmarijuanapolicyfindings.pdf

1/18/13: TAKE ACTION: Express your support for HB 150: https://secure2.convio.net/mpp/site/Advocacy?pagename=homepage&page=UserAction&id=1547&JServSessionIdr004=xc86ehe517.app213a 

1/18/13: TAKE ACTION: Express your support for HB 77, which will transfer jurisdiction over Hawaiiʻs medical marijuana program from the Department of Public Safety to the Department of Health: http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/measure_indiv.aspx?billtype=HB&billnumber=77&year=2013 

4 thoughts on “Take Action!”

  1. I’ve lived and worked on Maui for 11 years and I don’t use drugs.
    I’m in favor of legalizing Marijuana, because of the benefits to society (by taxing it), and to decrease its illegal sales, and most importantly to get the police out of the drug business!
    It would be wonderful if when one reported a crime, that the police promptly investigated it. Unfortunately, that isn’t what happens.

Leave a Reply