Dead Bills

These are bills that have missed deadlines and are no longer alive for the 2015 legislative session. These bills may still be alive in the 2016 legislative session.

Tax and Regulate (Legalization) Bills

HB1371 Repeal of marijuana laws. This bill removes prohibitions against marijuana from the law, making it legal to grow and possess, but illegal to give to a minor. This does not establish any regulation or tax structure for marijuana.

  • introduced by: SAN BUENAVENTURA, CREAGAN, Ing, Rhoads
  • Referred to JUD 
  • HB1203 – Authorizing counties to legalize marijuana. This bill allows counties to pass an ordinance allowing for the cultivation, sale, and possession of marijuana by adults for any reason. While this is an interesting approach to legalizing marijuana, there are several problems with this approach. The lack of statewide regulation may present problems regarding federal interference, and the fact that the bill excludes ballot initiatives means that it may not bring about marijuana legalization as quickly or uniformly as its drafters hope.
    • Introduced in the House by: CREAGAN
    • Referred to: JUD
      12/17/15 HB1203: Carried over to 2016 Regular Session.
    • HB717Taxing and Regulating marijuana. This bill tasks the Department of Taxation with the licensing, rulemaking, and administration of a new legal recreational marijuana industry. It also specifies a $100 civil penalty, rather than criminal penalties, for the violation of the rules established by the Department of Taxation. It also specifies that it will not limit any rights or privileges of medical marijuana patients and caregivers. The bill creates a tax rate of 20% with 2% going to drug abuse prevention programs, public security progrms, and the administrative expenses of the department of taxation. Introduced by MCKELVEY, THIELEN, C. Lee, Mizuno, San Buenaventura.
      • Referred to: JUD, FIN
        12/17/15 HB717: Carried over to 2016 Regular Session.
  • SB873Taxing and Regulating marijuana. This bill tasks the Department of Taxation with the licensing, rulemaking, and administration of a new legal recreational marijuana industry. This is a relatively simple approach that defers many of the important questions to the department of taxation to determine. This bill allows personal growers to grow up to six plants, as long as not more than three are “mature,” a distinction that has proven troublesome in the medical marijuana field. Moreover unlike in HB717 the tax revenue from the program is not earmarked or deposited into any specific fund, which may be a notable weakness of the program going forward.
    • Introduced by ENGLISH, GALUTERIA, RUDERMAN, Dela Cruz.
    • Referred to: PSM/CPN, JDL/WAM
      12/17/15 SB873: Carried over to 2016 Regular Session.
    • SB1259Authorizing counties to legalize marijuana. This bill allows counties to pass an ordinance allowing for the cultivation, sale, and possession of marijuana by adults for any reason. While this is an interesting approach to legalizing marijuana, there are several problems with this approach. The lack of statewide regulation may present problems regarding federal interference, and the fact that the bill excludes ballot initiatives means that it may not bring about marijuana legalization as quickly or uniformly as its drafters hope.
      • Introduced in the Senate by: KEITH-AGARAN, ENGLISH, ESPERO, RUDERMAN, Dela Cruz, Galuteria, Kahele, Shimabukuro
      • Referred to: HTH, JDL 

Marijuana Decriminalization Bills

  • SB666 –  Of the several decriminalization bills introduced this session, this bill was one of the more robust. It includes provisions pertaining to enforcing civil fines, which has been a point of contention in the past, as well as protection for paraphernalia, which in some other states has limited the effectiveness of decrim bills. It also has protections so that small amounts of marijuana shall not cause the revocation of parole or probation.
    • Introduced by ESPERO, GALUTERIA.
    • Referred to: JDL
      12/17/15 SB666: Carried over to 2016 Regular Session.
  • SB708 / SB681Decriminalization. This bill that establishes a civil penalty for possession of up to an ounce of marijuana, and makes common sense changes to the law to prevent marijuana from causing the revocation of parole or probation. The bill contains no specific protections for paraphernalia, which is an issue that has been a problem with decriminalization laws in other states.SB708 Introduced by GABBARD, DELA CRUZ, ENGLISH, ESPERO, RUDERMAN, Riviere
    • Referred to: JDL
      12/17/15 SB708: Carried over to 2016 Regular Session.
    • SB681 introduced by ESPERO, GALUTERIA.
    • Referred to: JDL
      12/17/15 SB681: Carried over to 2016 Regular Session.
    • SB596Decriminalization. Like the others it features a fine of $100 for possession of up to an ounce of marijuana. It applies only to people over the age of 18 so as to ensure that minors are still subject to the same procedures as before. This bill contains a number of important protections including protections for parolees and people on probation, as well as protections for paraphernalia. It also specifies that medical marijuana patients are not subject to this civil violation. It now also contains a provision that removes these protections if a person is found to be in possession of marijuana within 1,000 feet of a school. This is problematic as that definition applies to nearly all of Honolulu.
      • Introduced by: RUDERMAN, ENGLISH, ESPERO, GABBARD, SHIMABUKURO.
      • Referred to: HTH, JDL
        12/17/15 SB596: Carried over to 2016 Regular Session.
      • SB879Simple Decriminalization. This is a bill that establishes a civil violation (with a $100 fine) for possession of up to an ounce of marijuana. While this is a very simple decriminalization bill, it does not have certain features that are important in a decriminalization bill, such as protection for paraphernalia.
        • Introduced by ENGLISH, DELA CRUZ, ESPERO, INOUYE, RUDERMAN, Baker, Shimabukuro.
        • Referred to: JDL
        • Passed Third Reading, as amended (SD 1). Ayes, 22; Aye(s) with reservations: Senator(s) Inouye, Slom . Noes, 3 (Senator(s) Harimoto, Kidani, Kouchi). Excused, 0 (none). Transmitted to House,
        • 3/10/15 Passed 1st Reading.
        • bill has not been scheduled for a hearing in time to meet the second lateral deadline–and is no longer active for the 2015 session.
        • Again, These BILLS WHICH ARE NO LONGER ACTIVE FOR THE 2015 SESSION and considered "dead", may still be alive in the 2016 session.